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Post subject: Re: Guitar Books
Posted: Wed Aug 01, 2018 9:49 am
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Aspiring Musician
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Once you master the rudiments, this is a great series featuring jazz standards notated in 'lead sheet' format.

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Fender Play December 2018
Post subject: Re: Guitar Books
Posted: Sat Aug 04, 2018 3:34 pm
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Does anyone know how long it takes to learn from the book?

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Last edited by richihendricks on Mon Oct 15, 2018 6:21 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Post subject: Re: Guitar Books
Posted: Mon Aug 06, 2018 4:44 am
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richihendricks wrote:
Does anyone know how long it takes to learn from the book?

Well, it all depends on which book you are learning from and how much time you have to devote to it each day. I guess you could probably get through the "Book Ones" of the Mel Bay or Hal Leonard Series I mentioned in maybe 3 to 6 months if you're working on them diligently, even quicker if you already have some background.

I've been spending the last year or so reviewing Book One of "A Modern Method for Guitar," aka "The Berklee Method," and I'm still not through it. But that is a much more advanced book and my time is pretty limited, so...


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Post subject: Re: Guitar Books
Posted: Wed Aug 08, 2018 7:39 am
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Just as a baseline, I would say the first 2 years of learning weren't all pleasant. The 2 year mark was where things started really getting fun.


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Post subject: Re: Guitar Books
Posted: Wed Aug 08, 2018 12:15 pm
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ghost_of_strings wrote:
Just as a baseline, I would say the first 2 years of learning weren't all pleasant. The 2 year mark was where things started really getting fun.

Guitar is sort of a funny instrument that way. It takes a while for most people to play anything that sounds remotely musical. You have to work for months at least to build up hand strength and get a feel for the instrument. A little different from -- say, piano -- where most novices can play something fairly pleasant sounding right off the bat.


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Post subject: Re: Guitar Books
Posted: Thu Aug 09, 2018 6:45 am
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Indeed. A keyboard or even a real piano amounts to a matrix of "buttons" that push down the hammers. The hammer will hit the string at exactly the same angle whether Mozart pushes the button or Steve Urkel.

With fretboard instruments, if you are pushing too hard on the string, or slightly bending it in one direction or the other, things will sound 'out of tune' even if the instrument is properly tuned. It takes time to build "muscle memory" and that's why pretty much nobody just picks up a guitar and immediately plays something pleasant sounding. Even with open tunings.


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Post subject: Re: Guitar Books
Posted: Mon Aug 20, 2018 8:22 am
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I agree that guitar has a character that takes on it’s own personality.

Looking at Blues for an example. Let’s take a trip off road in the Mississippi Delta. You’ll find highly technical players and those who are far from it. Consider that illiteracy may be a deterrence; although, less prevalent today. One may have more access to learning, or more ability to learn, none of the former, or no need to be any of that. Style may trump technique.

Whatever the case, the music and mojo comes through, and some of it is fine. Mighty fine indeed

So the question begs to be asked, “How long does it take to learn to be proficient? “ Well, that probably could be, “How long does it take to learn?”

If I could, but highly unlikely, learn all of the 2600 chords in the book that I have, would that make me a guitarist? I suppose. Would I be musical? Not necessarily. I’ll teach you drum rudiments; but, if you can’t keep time or have it in you . . . even a single stroke isn’t going to get you from here to there. Move on to percussion notation and now you have opened a Pandora’s box.

Using the “muscle memory” analogy as ghost_of_strings made mention of, when I took drum lessons in my teens I was given one stick to practice bouncing off a pillow for a month! Well, that was pretty boring and disheartening. :( The purpose of the exercise was to build up wrist movement and to have it drilled into my head that there was a difference between hitting and lifting off. You can’t goof off and deviate without two sticks, and bouncing off a pad isn’t the same as lifting. YMMV It worked! :D I moved on to the next step.

Guitar is something like that. There are some rules that just can’t be broken, and exercises that will put you to sleep and others that will fill you with frustration. Some of that direction will come from books. Maybe, Fender Play will be your choice. So many options are within reach today. As with those Bluesmen and ladies, the knowledge could be begged, borrowed, stolen, or (for the very few) come naturally. All these methods have limitations, but the rewards outweigh the rest.

The book is a tool. How you use it to build is up to you. :wink:
FSB








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Post subject: Re: Guitar Books
Posted: Mon Aug 20, 2018 4:20 pm
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For me, the biggest strides in my playing occur when I am performing or jamming regularly with others. It gets you extra focused on rhythm, dynamics, and the sound of your instrument within the context of the band. When you are playing alone, your brain can sort of trick you into thinking you are sounding great -- when you listen to a recording of your playing, however, it's not quite as good as you might think. Using a metronome and regularly recording yourself can help a lot, but IMO an hour of (focused) practicing with a band can be as productive as a week of practicing on your own.


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Post subject: Re: Guitar Books
Posted: Mon Aug 20, 2018 6:46 pm
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I agree with you, schnepf13. Playing with others may not always tell you how good you are, but it certainly can tell you how bad you might be which can be very constructive as with any of the arts.

Others will tell you, however, that band practice is not a replacement for practicing alone. When you show up to practice as a group that is how it should be approached. Hopefully, you’ll have practiced your part enough to be part of the whole. That’s why it’s called a band practice. I’ve had bands in a studio that acted like recording time was practice time. The curtain came down at times. Other bands may need direction or arrangement or performance adjustments. But, that should not be a compromise to the group’s rehearsals or performance.

One way around it is to buddy up, perhaps, drummer and bass player, lead and rhythm, keyboard and vocalist and practice together before or, if necessary, at band rehearsal with some isolation or break preferred. Off in the corner or around the corner can be beneficial. No set rule here; but, that’s the gist. Anything that works is good; but, unless it’s a jam, organization is key or you’ll make one step forward and two steps back.

The greats in this business may not practice alone, but a great many do, and some have admitted to practicing for hours on end day after day.

I really don’t think one size fits all. I do think that if you practice with or without a book - make it count. The sooner you get it right, the sooner you get to move on, and don’t forget to appreciate what you’ve accomplished big or small. There will always be someone better or worse or just different. It could simply be that they were able to practice more (talent aside). Then there’s that age old saying that I use, “If only I had practiced more”. :wink:
FSB

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Post subject: Re: Guitar Books
Posted: Tue Aug 21, 2018 5:17 am
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Very true, FSB. My most recent band experience was a good example of this. Each member was extremely good about learning his or her individual parts -- this made it a lot easier when we'd get together for our weekly rehearsal sessions. And by the time we made it to a recording studio, the songs were polished enough that we were able to get in and out with minimal hassle and cost.


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Post subject: Re: Guitar Books
Posted: Tue Aug 21, 2018 7:30 am
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schnepf13 wrote:
Very true, FSB. My most recent band experience was a good example of this. Each member was extremely good about learning his or her individual parts -- this made it a lot easier when we'd get together for our weekly rehearsal sessions. And by the time we made it to a recording studio, the songs were polished enough that we were able to get in and out with minimal hassle and cost.
Gotta like that. Congrats! :D
FSB

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Post subject: Re: Guitar Books
Posted: Sun Nov 11, 2018 8:25 pm
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This book on the history of Fender electric guitars is really interesting. It's worth checking out.

https://amzn.to/2DfLfEu

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Post subject: Re: Guitar Books
Posted: Mon Nov 12, 2018 5:41 am
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Welcome, timtheshredder. The book looks good. Nice addition to the thread. Thanks!

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