It is currently Thu Jul 19, 2018 10:06 pm

All times are UTC - 7 hours



Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 14 posts ] 
Author Message
Post subject: Need help avoiding a muted string
Posted: Fri Aug 04, 2017 10:31 am
Offline
Hobbyist
Hobbyist

Joined: Fri Aug 04, 2017 10:24 am
Posts: 3
Seeking help with Em chord. When I use fingers 1 and 2 to fret E minor, finger 1 mutes the high e string. I've had the action adjusted on my acoustic, but it didn't solve the problem. I play both electric and acoustic. Have the same problem with both my Fender Strat and Taylor six-string.


Top
Profile
Fender Play February 2018
Post subject: Re: Need help avoiding a muted string
Posted: Sun Aug 06, 2017 11:27 pm
Offline
Rock Star
Rock Star

Joined: Tue Jul 17, 2007 1:53 am
Posts: 3278
The "usual" way to play an open E-minor is with fingers 2&3, you could try that. In addition, it simplifies the E<>Eminor change.
Pay attention to your wrist angle and thumb position.
And then it's just practice, practice, practice...


Top
Profile
Post subject: Re: Need help avoiding a muted string
Posted: Mon Aug 07, 2017 12:13 am
Offline
Professional Musician
Professional Musician
User avatar

Joined: Wed Oct 29, 2014 1:50 am
Posts: 2672
Location: Arizona USA
+1
This is a very easy chord to play. Here is a short video that may help you:

BTW - I think you mean that you are muting the low E string.
Good luck and don't give up. You'll make that chord sing out in no time. :)

_________________
Marky

Remember the music is not in the guitar


Top
Profile
Post subject: Re: Need help avoiding a muted string
Posted: Mon Aug 07, 2017 6:27 am
Offline
Hobbyist
Hobbyist

Joined: Fri Aug 04, 2017 10:24 am
Posts: 3
Thanks for the suggestions. I can consistently play a perfect e minor chord using fingers 2 and 3, but that does not allow me to easily pivot to the C chord. Using fingers 1 and 2 DOES allow that pivot. But I often mute the high e--yes, the high e (first string) --with the underside of my pinkie finger. (FYI, I have long slender fingers, not the kind that should get in the way.)


Top
Profile
Post subject: Re: Need help avoiding a muted string
Posted: Wed Aug 09, 2017 6:55 am
Offline
Rock Star
Rock Star
User avatar

Joined: Mon Jan 12, 2009 4:50 pm
Posts: 7331
Location: ʎɹʇunoɔ ǝsoɹ pןıʍ
My advise is to get used to using fingers 2&3 and then work on getting comfortable with your new transition to C.

People who choose to deviate from the standard way of fingering chords are sometimes rewarded with some kind of benefit.
It might be easy or fast or simpler.
That's only sometimes, though.
Much more often they are thwarted by their habits and are in a position of being unable to progress beyond some point until they go back and correct something and then start over from there.

In the long run it is better to learn not to take shortcuts.

_________________
Image


Top
Profile
Post subject: Re: Need help avoiding a muted string
Posted: Wed Aug 09, 2017 9:08 am
Offline
Hobbyist
Hobbyist

Joined: Fri Aug 04, 2017 10:24 am
Posts: 3
Thanks for your advice. I will switch to fingers 2 and 3.


Top
Profile
Post subject: Re: Need help avoiding a muted string
Posted: Tue Jun 19, 2018 10:18 am
Offline
Aspiring Musician
Aspiring Musician
User avatar

Joined: Thu Mar 24, 2011 2:50 pm
Posts: 414
Location: TURKEY
Weirdly enough , I have never played Em with fingers 1+2
I play a major E by playing the exact same shape as an F barre chord , just slide it down to E , lift fingers 1+ 2 then it's an easy job to change to a C
(Also easier changing from E major to A m , just move 34+5 over one string )

_________________
Ted

"All right, guys, uh, listen. This is a blues riff in "B", watch me for the changes, and try and keep up, okay?"


Top
Profile
Post subject: Re: Need help avoiding a muted string
Posted: Fri Jun 22, 2018 8:27 am
Offline
Aspiring Musician
Aspiring Musician

Joined: Fri Oct 06, 2017 6:46 pm
Posts: 497
Location: ʞɹo⅄ ʍǝN
I learned it with fingers 1&2 originally and switched to 2&3 (mostly). There are certain situations where the other fingering works better. Whatever the case, just keep practicing and it will fix itself.


Top
Profile
Post subject: Re: Need help avoiding a muted string
Posted: Wed Jun 27, 2018 7:13 am
Offline
Professional Musician
Professional Musician

Joined: Wed Aug 26, 2009 4:50 pm
Posts: 1068
Location: Garland (DFW), TX, USA
Most often, I just use one finger for open E minor. And just two fingers for open E major. That's part of why I prefer narrow nut widths -- 1.5" is my favorite. When I've replaced nuts on wide necks, I space the slots narrower.

But in my opinion, it's a mistake to lock into only one fingering for a specific chord. You have to keep in mind the before and after. When playing a progession of chords, it can be much more fluid to use different fingerings.

You say that using the first and second finger makes the switch to/from open C major easier for you? That's fine -- use that fingering when switching from/to open C. And if a progession is more fluid if you use fingers 3&4, use that.

Regardless, as said earlier it all come down to practice, practice, practice. There are times you want all the notes to ring clearly, and there are times you want to mute individual strings. In time, that becomes automatic/subconscious. Same for fingering choices -- at first you'll have to think about it, and experiment over and over to find the fingering that works best for a particular progression. But eventually it becomes automatic.


Top
Profile
Post subject: Re: Need help avoiding a muted string
Posted: Wed Jun 27, 2018 7:38 am
Offline
Aspiring Musician
Aspiring Musician

Joined: Fri Oct 06, 2017 6:46 pm
Posts: 497
Location: ʞɹo⅄ ʍǝN
strayedstrater wrote:
just two fingers for open E major.

How are you doing this with 2 fingers? What is the fingering?

Image


Top
Profile
Post subject: Re: Need help avoiding a muted string
Posted: Wed Jun 27, 2018 1:23 pm
Offline
Professional Musician
Professional Musician

Joined: Wed Aug 26, 2009 4:50 pm
Posts: 1068
Location: Garland (DFW), TX, USA
ghost_of_strings wrote:
strayedstrater wrote:
just two fingers for open E major.

How are you doing this with 2 fingers? What is the fingering?

Image


Two different fingering options.

Index finger on the G string. Second (middle) finger -- tip on the A string, flex/roll it so it also frets the D string.

Or middle finger on the G string and ring finger fretting A&D strings.

It's very similar to using one finger to play an open A chord. Or the A chord barre shape, with index barring all 6 strings and the ring finger barring the D, G, & B strings

On the E major chord, by straightening/unrolling the finger that has its tip on the A string, I can toggle between E and E7.

On "Cat's Squirrel", you play an E chord and toggle the G string between G sharp and A. I can do that just by rolling the finger that's fretting the A&D strings a little more so it also frets the G string at the second fret.


Top
Profile
Post subject: Re: Need help avoiding a muted string
Posted: Wed Jun 27, 2018 4:59 pm
Offline
Aspiring Musician
Aspiring Musician

Joined: Fri Oct 06, 2017 6:46 pm
Posts: 497
Location: ʞɹo⅄ ʍǝN
ok yeah that was what came to mind and it's always a tough fingering for me. My finger tips tend to lock into place when I try those fingerings.

I'm more of a lead player, so what I do a lot is drop the lowest 2 strings and play the top of the chord. Sounds great when the rhythm player or piano is covering the low notes.


Top
Profile
Post subject: Re: Need help avoiding a muted string
Posted: Wed Jun 27, 2018 5:54 pm
Offline
Professional Musician
Professional Musician

Joined: Wed Aug 26, 2009 4:50 pm
Posts: 1068
Location: Garland (DFW), TX, USA
Yep. While it's important to develop enough technique to sound all 6 strings cleanly and clearly, it's often/usually more musical to not play all 6.

Being able to selectively mute strings, and/or only hit 3 or 4 strings while strumming, is just as important as being able to play a 6 note chord.

Even open "cowboy chords". You don't want the low E to ring out on an open D chord. And a 6 string open C has 3 major thirds and only 1 fifth -- it's often best to leave at least one of the E's silent.


Top
Profile
Post subject: Re: Need help avoiding a muted string
Posted: Thu Jul 05, 2018 10:04 am
Offline
Aspiring Musician
Aspiring Musician

Joined: Fri Oct 06, 2017 6:46 pm
Posts: 497
Location: ʞɹo⅄ ʍǝN
strayedstrater wrote:
Being able to selectively mute strings, and/or only hit 3 or 4 strings while strumming, is just as important as being able to play a 6 note chord.


Yes, I should have mentioned, the goal for a lot of players is 3 notes per chord. That's a jazz technique and it sounds great (IMO). You should be able to break down most chords to just 3 notes (triad) and let the rest of the band fill in the rest. Steely Dan were pros at this. For example, the intro to "Peg":



Top
Profile
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 14 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 7 hours

Fender Play February 2018

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to: