It is currently Wed Nov 13, 2019 12:47 pm

All times are UTC - 7 hours



Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 19 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Go to page 1, 2  Next
Author Message
Post subject: Clean mode for G-Dec
Posted: Mon May 05, 2008 9:30 pm
Offline
Hobbyist
Hobbyist

Joined: Mon May 05, 2008 9:13 pm
Posts: 4
I saw the G-Dec demoed at my guitar dealer last week, saw the Eric Johnson videos and I want one.

Obviously I'd use it mostly for the effects, but I'm still learning and would want to play in clean mode once in a while. I see in a different topic that the G-Dec Jr doesn't have one, although 2 presets are described as "close". Does anyone know if the basic G-Dec has a clean setting? Or planning to add one in an upgrade?


Top
Profile
Fender Play November 2019
Post subject:
Posted: Thu May 15, 2008 6:11 pm
Offline
Hobbyist
Hobbyist

Joined: Mon May 05, 2008 9:13 pm
Posts: 4
I'm kind of sorry no one has replied. I've bought the basic G-Dec now (not the junior). It's great for what it does. I'll only use about 5 of the presets for the backing tracks, but I like the effects on about 40 of them.

I love playing to the presets, or using the presets just for my own stuff. Still after a while it is unrelenting and I want it to just shut the f*** up so I can play clean. It's kind of sad - I'll need two practice amps. Fortunately I have an old beat up little Gorilla amp but I was hoping to retire it.

If anyone from Fender sees this, I do have one question. Is clean mode being considered for future releases of the G-Dec, preferably in a firmware update?


Top
Profile
Post subject:
Posted: Thu May 15, 2008 7:53 pm
Offline
Rock Star
Rock Star
User avatar

Joined: Fri Feb 29, 2008 9:49 pm
Posts: 3233
Location: Memphis
Hey, check out [link to old website removed] you may find some answers there.
I have a gdec 30, so im not to familiar with the basic gdec.. but Im sure that with a little experimentation you can get a clean sound
Good Luck and have fun with your Gdec

Bill


Top
Profile
Post subject:
Posted: Fri May 16, 2008 4:47 pm
Offline
Hobbyist
Hobbyist

Joined: Mon May 05, 2008 9:13 pm
Posts: 4
Thanks Bill. I've gone over there and gotten some good ideas.

I'm still hoping Fender adds this as the default setting in future releases though.


Top
Profile
Post subject:
Posted: Tue May 20, 2008 1:30 pm
Offline
Amateur
Amateur

Joined: Fri Jul 20, 2007 6:50 pm
Posts: 117
The GDec wasn't meant to be an "effect" to be bypassed. from what I understand, you are asking for a bypass mode. None of the Gdecs have one. Every time you turn one on, you are playing through an amp emulation.

There are no "Clean" or "Bypassed" operation. You can; however, select a patch that emulates a clean amplifyer, like a clean baseman (Tweed 1) or an clean Twin (Blackface 1).

These are not bypass modes they are just clean sounding amps. If you are looking for a cleanish patch to play country or folk, there are several on the patch collection at "[link to old website removed]"


Top
Profile
Post subject:
Posted: Wed Jun 18, 2008 6:34 am
Offline
Professional Musician
Professional Musician
User avatar

Joined: Mon Jan 28, 2008 5:53 am
Posts: 1686
Location: Brooklyn NY
As Workerbee states, if you switch from Tweed 3 you`ll eliminate some of that fuzz/distortion. I didn`t care for that fuzz either but when I went to Tweed 1 it sounded cleaner. Experiment with changing the amps themselves and you should be able to get what your looking for.


Top
Profile
Post subject:
Posted: Fri Aug 01, 2008 11:45 am
Offline
Hobbyist
Hobbyist

Joined: Sat Jul 12, 2008 10:20 am
Posts: 10
You can reprogram any of the default presets with a wide variety of amps and effects. You can change keys, speed up, slow down..........sounds to me like nobody is reading the manual. Any of the channels or presets should I say, can be made as clean as you want or as dirty as you want. It's a great little practice device.


Top
Profile
Post subject:
Posted: Sun Sep 21, 2008 1:16 pm
Offline
Hobbyist
Hobbyist

Joined: Sun Sep 21, 2008 12:58 pm
Posts: 4
Hi folks,
Yes, I'm a bit disappointed that there are not some good clean tones dialed in from the start... most are highly distorted/processed.
I realize that the tweed 1 and blackface 1 are the places to start and I am tweaking them, but does anybody have some settings that will give a nice warm jazz tone, like a Wes Montgomery tone (he used a twin reverb, I think)?

Thanks


Top
Profile
Post subject:
Posted: Tue Sep 23, 2008 7:24 am
Offline
Amateur
Amateur

Joined: Sun Jul 22, 2007 10:50 am
Posts: 102
The answer I am about to provide may annoy some, but it truly makes sense when you accept it and apply it. I have the B-DEC 30, and was incredibly frustrated by not having a preset that was "clean". In fact, the lack of a clean tone led me to buy another amp and put the B-DEC in the closet.

This changed when I got a Toneport UX2. As I sampled all the presets and compared them to the clean signal, I realized that the clean tone was BORING. FLAT. LIFELESS. UNINSPIRING.

See, we listen to music and we want to play and sound like our favorite Guitar or Bass Hero. They all have a particular sound that is generated by various amp and effects settings. Even when we say we want a clean tone, each of us subjectively define what clean means for us.

Armed with this insight, I pulled my B-DEC out, did some research on how each setting works, then started experimenting. For me, this was really eye opening and fun. I created a "clean setting on one of the user presets:

Bassman Amp
Gain 8.2
Amp Volume 10.0
Contour 6.0
Compressor High
Timbre None
Noise Gate High
FX Type None

This created what was acceptable for me in terms of clean signal.

In closing, I want to point out something that seems to be ignored or misunderstood: that there are no clean settings for any amp. Because each amp uses specific components, with specific power ratings each will create a sound that is unique from every other amp. In fact, the very basis of Amp Modelers and FX units is emulate the AMP/Cabinet models that have become standards, such as the Beatles sound, or the WHO sound, or the Motown sound. So as you continue to hone your craft, also take some time to understand how modern amplification works and learn the affect of each setting available, the craft a sound that is all your own. Who knows, maybe one day you will have a signature modeler that everyone wants to buy so they can sound like you when they play!

Peace!


Top
Profile
Post subject:
Posted: Tue Sep 23, 2008 6:37 pm
Offline
Hobbyist
Hobbyist

Joined: Sun Sep 21, 2008 12:58 pm
Posts: 4
OK, well, I think you guys that are saying that there is no such thing as a clean amp (or whatever) are missing the point. What us folks that are saying we want a clean setting are saying, is that we want a tone dialed in that sounds at least halfway like one of the famous clean fender amps: warm, a bit twangy, etc. It is obvious that each amp has components that give its "clean" a particular character, this is what makes amps interesting, otherwise we'd all play the same amp.

I have been using tweed 1 and blackface 1 with similar settings to those described by the B-Dec fellow above, and am somewhat satisfied, but still not there. When I get closer, I'll post the settings. I'm looking for a jazz sound.

But I am still disappointed. It is my first modeling amp, so maybe that's it, but I think the Rolands and Tech 21s, for example, are better-sounding. And don't say you can't get it from a solid-state amp... many solid-states are used for jazz as well as other styles and some have very good tube emulation.
I'm waiting to get some really good MIDI tracks plugged in, then I'll see how it sounds, but if I'm still disappointed, I'm getting rid of it. Fun toy, with great potential, but I think much of the potential was missed based on my experience so far. Maybe Guitar Rig or Amplitube with a better-sounding amp is the way to go, but I have no experience with either. I bought it because of the all-in-one aspect, drums, tuner, tracks, amps, etc. but it seems to sound slightly cheesy no matter what you do.

It is a gas to mess with, though, I'll give it that.
Another thing, I don't understand why only about 3 of the built-in tracks have a full progression, all the others just vamp on one or two chords.
The product just seems incomplete, I hope there will be software upgrades.


Top
Profile
Post subject:
Posted: Tue Sep 23, 2008 7:05 pm
Offline
Amateur
Amateur

Joined: Sun Jul 22, 2007 10:50 am
Posts: 102
Okay, I get your point, but I have a question. What is the difference between what the DEC does and what the Line 6 products do? I have about 100 different amp/cabinet combos preset, with the ability to customize anyone of them. Apparently, the B-DEC has a few more features than the G-DEC's, but the principle is the same. I imagine that the engineers at Fender mistakenly thought that most users want the most popular models that did not cannibalize the sale of their other products. In other words, they are not going to just give the jazz sound you are looking for when they can get you to buy it. As far as other companies modeling hardware or software, they are supposed to provide you all the bells and whistles, otherwise you would just buy the Fender or whatever amp you are GAS for.

Whatever route you decide to go, I hope you find your dream rig. It seems so few people are ever satisfied with what they have.


Peace


Top
Profile
Post subject:
Posted: Mon Sep 29, 2008 9:09 pm
Offline
Hobbyist
Hobbyist

Joined: Sat Jul 12, 2008 10:20 am
Posts: 10
Aloha to whoever was looking for something kinda clean. Here's something to try on the GDEC.
Amp.....Acoustic
Effect....phaser.....very very little
63 Spring........very little
Gain................7.0
Volume............7.5
Bass................7.0
Mids.................7.5
Treble..............8.0
Comp...............Off
Timbre............."Super Brite"
Gate.................low

If this doesn't work for you, I have more or you can make your own adjustments.
Lu


Top
Profile
Post subject:
Posted: Tue Oct 07, 2008 2:52 pm
Offline
Amateur
Amateur

Joined: Fri Jul 20, 2007 6:50 pm
Posts: 117
Well, I can't resist.

First, we need to help out our -Dec brother. Go to [link to old website removed]. Find the file repository and open the Gdec folder. There is an Excel spread sheet with over 300 different patches. I may have made a PDF version for those that don't have Office. In the amp section there are almost a dozen patches for the Fender twin and Tremolux plus 2 for the Bassman. That should give you at least 14 amp emulations of good sounding clean amplifiers.

As you roam through the patches, you may find a artist, like Eric Johnson, attached to a clean patch in the artist section. I think there is a Dwane Eddie patch also.

Now, for the other debate that is starting: Each persons sound has a personality based on that person's: playing style, guitar, amplifier, effects and all the settings used on all the equipment. At different points in my life I have thought each one of these four things was the most important. Now, I think what is important is finding your sound that you enjoy, but if we want to start the "most important equipment" discussion I will enjoy reading and responding.

In the modeling world, there are a few different things going on. At one end of the spectrum is what I call hard modeling. If you want to sound like "Johnny B Dangerous" then you buy a "Johnny D. Gizzmo" and when you step on the button, no matter what guitar you have or what pickup you have selected, you sound like Johnny. The original Rockman headset amp was like that. No matter what you did, you sounded like Boston. The Pandora is like that too. Dial in an Eddie V. patch and it doesn't matter what instrument you have, you get the sound.

In the opposite direction is what I call light modeling. You can make a selection called "Marchall Overdrive" and get the overdriven stack type of sound. However, here, if you turn down the volume knob, the overdrive backs off - just like a real amplifyer.

The cyber amps and the G-Dec family are on the light end of the extreme; along with the Vox Valvetronic family. The Vox family still has amplifier names marked on its selections. The Valvetronics are very touch responsive, but you really get the amp you select. It models the amplifier rather than the sound.

Fender has gone even lighter. The Fender amps don't model amplifiers, they model ideas. You have 4 blackface selections each with a personality similar to a group of amplifiers and/or modified amplifiers. From that personality you can adjust the controls to get exactly the sound you want at that point in time.

When I picked out the Cyber-Deluxe to be my primary amp the the G-Dec to be my practice/small amp, I tried everything manufactured. I was looking for an amp where you actually heard a difference when you switched pickups. Not a subtle change, but a difference. I dialed up an over driven sound and backed the volume off while I played. I wanted to hear the overdrive fad to a crispy sound, to a slightly lower volume clean sound and then the volume slowly reduce. I was looking for equipment where I could hear my technique at the beginning of the signal chain.

If you are looking for an amp that has four sounds, black twin, tweed deluxe, mesa and a large stack, then the G-Dec will be frustrating. That is not what it does. If you want an infinite pallet of sound containing all you can imagine including something suggesting these four sounds, then this is the right place.

If your the guy that will be frustrated that there isn't selections for specific amps and artists, go get the patch spread sheet and save yourself the headaches. If you are the other guy, let me warn you; every time you start experimenting, you will find whole new worlds of sounds you never knew were there.

Don't get me wrong, there are times and places where specific pieces of equipment are appropriate. I have a Pandora, its a great tool. Given the choice, I would take my Cyber-Deluxe over any other amp out there.


Top
Profile
Post subject:
Posted: Tue Dec 02, 2008 10:18 am
Offline
Hobbyist
Hobbyist

Joined: Wed Jul 18, 2007 6:49 am
Posts: 38
I was just browsing through some past posts and thought I'd throw in my 2-cents worth on this topic.
I previously owned a GDEC and found an oportunity to upgrade to a GDEC-30 (I sold the orig. GDEC). In both cases I have found the GDEC amps to be a great practice tool, and you have to realize that it what the intent was.... a practice tool.
That being said, I also didn't like the idea that when you first turn it on, you start up in that "Rockin' GDEC" effect and from there you start turning the knob to select something else.
So... with a little research on the GDEC forums (and plenty of manual reading) I started to understand how the GDEC works, what to expect, and how to use it!

So here is what I did.
(Note: You can change it all later, but this spells out the concept idea)
Start up in that "Rockin' GDEC" effect (or whatever it is).
Now change the settings as follows....
(Using the AMP button)
Amp - Blackface 1
Gain - 7.0
Amp Vol. - 9.0
Bass - 6.0
Middle - 6.0
Treble - 6.0
Compression - Off
Timbre - Off
Noise Gate - Off

(Now using the FX button)
Set each setting to either "off", "none", or "no fx"

Now press the SAVE button twice. This will save your settings in the "U00" memory. Notice that if you now turn off the amp and then turn it back on, it now starts in the "U00" Rockin' GDEC" instead of the original "P00 Rockin' GDEC" mode.

Now, we can use the Utility button to rename this setting "STARTUP" or "CLEAN" or "Plain Ol'" or whatever you like.
When you press the Utility button, is shows the "Edit Name" setting highlighted. Now turn the big knob and you will see it jump into the rename mode and the first letter changes as you continue to turn the knob. Select the first letter, then press the utility button to advance it to the next letter. Continue until you've spelled out the name of the setting you want.
When you're done, press the save button twice, and you're done!

Now when you first turn on the amp the user setting "U00 STARTUP" or whatever you chose, is the first setting you see and it's a plain jane start setting (in this case, it was a plain Blackface type setting). If you tweak the tone or add effects and resave it in the same memory location, it will always be there when you first turn on the amp!
You can continue to do that using U01 - U49 and the original P00-P49 still exist (just keep turning the knob... they're still all there).

I didn't come up with the original idea for the startup concept, but once it was explained to me and I set it up, I started to understand what this amp can do!

Hopefully it will give you some insight and a better understanding how you can go about to customize the individual settings any way you like and build up a bunch of custom settings!


Top
Profile
Post subject:
Posted: Thu Dec 04, 2008 6:22 pm
Offline
Amateur
Amateur

Joined: Fri Jul 20, 2007 6:50 pm
Posts: 117
Like he said. I used the BB King patch from the excel sheet for my start up, then modified it a little to sound more like George Benson.

The only thing limiting your sound is the person turning the knobs. Down load the patch spread sheet and to get a head start. As you try things, the sounds will fall into place. The menus are really easy. It won't take long before you are off discovering new sounds.

A small amp that you can tuck under your arm will never sound exactly like a real, full size amp, but it can sound very close. Close enough that when recorded you cant tell the difference.


Top
Profile
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 19 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Go to page 1, 2  Next

All times are UTC - 7 hours

Fender Play November 2019

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to: